The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has delayed implementation of its new representation case rules to June 1, 2020. (For more on the new rule, which was supposed to be effective on April 16, 2020, see Labor Board: Upcoming New Election Rule Relieves Employers of Many Burdens of Quickie Election Rule.)

The NLRB previously

Among the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) rulemaking priorities under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) are its representation-case procedures, “blocking charge” and voluntary recognition standards, student status as employees, and access to employer private property.

The priorities are included in the Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions (Long Term Actions/Short Term Actions), a semiannual compilation of information about regulations under development by federal agencies, published in the spring and fall, that detail the most significant regulatory actions agencies expect to take in the coming year. The Board did not set forth expected rulemaking dates, but short-term actions likely will occur during 2019.


Continue Reading Representation-Case Procedures, Students as Employees, Access to Private Property on NLRB Rulemaking Agenda

The National Labor Relations Board may be poised to  issue its revised “quickie” election case rules before NLRB Member Nancy Schiffer’s term expires on December 16, 2014 (see Expect NLRB Whirlwind before Schiffer Leaves).

But the revised election rules could be short-lived. After the Republicans have gained a majority the Senate in

The National Labor Relations Board yesterday began public hearings on proposed changes to its rules  governing representation elections.  The proposed rules were published in the Federal Register on February 6, 2014. See Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Representation-Case Procedures.

The deadline for initial public comments on the rules ended on April 7; reply comments are

Having scheduled a public hearing (April 10 and 11, 2014) on its  resurrected proposal for  accelerated representation case procedures,    the National Labor Relations Board has published a list of “issues” it wants addressed at the hearing.  Many of these issues indicate the Board’s overhaul of its representation case procedures may be even more radical than

The National Labor Relations Board’s controversial regulation requiring almost all private sector employers to post notices in the workplace informing employees of their rights under the National Labor Relations Act should no longer keep employers awake at night.

According to an NLRB press release, the Board has decided not to seek Supreme Court review of

The National Labor Relations Board, the United States Chamber of Commerce and the Coalition for a Democratic Workforce have stipulated to voluntarily dismiss the NLRB’s appeal to the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit of a district court ruling invalidating the NLRB’s “quickie election rule.”  This paves the way for

Not satisfied, it seems, merely with issuing individual case decisions that favor organized labor, the National Labor Relations Board has proposed a rule that would require employers to notify employees of their rights under the National Labor Relations Act through a uniform workplace posting. The posting would be required for both unionized and non-unionized employers

In response to the United States Department of Labor’s request for public comments on its proposed rulemaking implementing President Barack Obama’s Executive Order No. 13496, Jackson Lewis LLP, on behalf of its clients and other employers, has provided the Department with detailed comments and suggestions for improvements to the proposed rule. The Executive Order, signed January