As expected, the Senate Democratic majority failed to muster the votes necessary to invoke cloture on the nomination of Craig Becker to the NLRB yesterday. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s release below provides additional details as well as three possible directions this might take.

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TO:     All Members of the U.S. Chamber’s Labor Relations Committee

With the Administration’s nomination of Craig Becker for a seat on the National Labor Relations Board set for a cloture vote in the Senate today, Nebraska’s Democratic Senator Ben Nelson has announced he will join with Republicans in opposing the Senate leadership’s motion to cut off debate on Becker.  Cloture would clear the way for

As expected, the Senate HELP Committee has approved the nomination of Craig Becker to the NLRB on a party line vote. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s release below provides additional details.

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TO:   Members of the U.S. Chamber’s Labor Relations Committee and other interested members of the business community

As scheduled the Committee on Health, Education,

Senator Orrin Hatch’s (R-Utah) opening remarks on the first day of Senate HELP Committee hearings on the nomination of Craig Becker to the NLRB, available here, contained a salvo of questions probing the nominee’s controversial positions on key labor relations law issues, such as his view that employers should have no right express

Immediate action called for by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce in connection with the Becker nomination to the NLRB. See Chamber’s release below.  Additional information about the possible impact of this appointment will be found in several recent Jackson Lewis EFCA and Labor Law Reform blog. If you would like to discuss the significance

The Senate HELP Committee will hold a hearing on the Craig Becker nomination to the NLRB on February 2 at 4:00 p.m. (http://help.senate.gov/Hearings/2010_02_02/2010_02_02.html).  The Committee will then consider him and we expect Becker’s nomination will be approved and likely referred to the full Senate for confirmation.  Senate Democrats may try to rush Becker’s confirmation vote

Workplace discrimination on the basis of an employee’s support for, or opposition to, a labor organization has been unlawful since 1935, when the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) was passed.  One exception to this principle of non-discrimination:  In non-right-to-work states, such as Massachusetts and California, an employee can be required to pay union dues under

On January 1, 2010, Oregon Senate Bill 519 became effective, making Oregon the first state in the country to bar employers from requiring employees to attend meetings to learn about the company’s views about unionization. The law has several components, including the creation of a new classification of wrongful termination lawsuits and the requirement that all

As reported here, the Senate late last year unanimously refused to carry over Mr. Becker’s nomination for consideration in the next Session of Congress. The nomination was thus returned to President Obama.  Now, according to the New York Times, President Obama has decided to renominate Craig Becker as a member of the National Labor Relations

Craig Becker’s NLRB nomination may not have been thrown under the bus, but it certainly seems to have been thrown off of it. 

Just prior to adjournment on December 24, the Senate unanimously refused to carry over Mr. Becker’s nomination for consideration in the next Session of Congress.  It was returned to the President.  As