Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act

The election of Donald Trump as the 45th President of the United States carries with it the possibility of major changes in the field of labor law. The most significant changes likely will come at the National Labor Relations Board.  Currently, the five-member NLRB has a 2 to 1  Democratic (and pro-labor) majority, with

Fourteen state attorneys general have written to Secretary of Labor Thomas Perez complaining that the  Department of Labor’s proposed “persuader” rule would undermine attorney-client privilege and have requested the rule “be withdrawn as drafted.”

The Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act (LMRDA) requires reporting to the DOL of “[a]ny agreement or arrangement with a labor relations

The Department of Labor’s proposed final revisions to its rule requiring employers and others to report arrangements, receipts, and expenditures derived from providing services defined as persuasive activities will not be implemented by the March 2014 target date.  A new implementation date was not announced.  This is the second delay for the revisions, which originally