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Daniel D. Schudroff is an Associate in the New York City office of Jackson Lewis P.C.. His practice is focused on traditional labor matters, employment litigation, and counseling. Mr. Schudroff represents clients in both federal and state courts, as well as before administrative agencies including the National Labor Relations Board, New York State Public Employment Relations Board, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, New York State Division of Human Rights, New York City Commission on Human Rights, and New York State Department of Labor. Mr. Schudroff also advocates on behalf of employers at arbitration hearings and during collective bargaining negotiations. In addition, Mr. Schudroff regularly advises unionized and non-unionized clients with respect to a wide array of issues arising under the National Labor Relations Act and Labor Management Reporting and Disclosure Act. Mr. Schudroff also regularly counsels employers affected by the Fair Labor Standards Act, Railway Labor Act, Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act, Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act, New York Labor Law, and Taylor Law.

As noted in our previous post about Dirty Dancing, as part of its investigation into thefts of guests’ property, the resort owner interviewed staff dance instructor, Johnny Castle (Johnny denies involvement in the burglaries), to determine whether he had an alibi for the evening when Moe Pressman’s wallet was stolen. We now know that Castle

There are films with clear labor law undertones, such as On The Waterfront and Norma Rae. The National Labor Relations Act and its teachings, however, lurk in other pop culture examples.

Thirty years ago, the romantic drama, Dirty Dancing premiered. The plot centers around the relationship between Baby (Frances) Housman (coincidentally, named after the

Enforcing a National Labor Relations Board order, the federal appeals court in Chicago has held an employer unlawfully denied a union safety specialist access to its facility to examine the site of a fatal accident (the cause of which had not been determined) involving a bargaining unit employee. Caterpillar Inc. v. NLRB, No. 14-3528

An employer may discipline employees who engage in disloyal conduct by disclosing confidential information obtained in the course of their job duties, the Board’s Division of Advice has found, concluding that an employer did not commit an unfair labor practice (under Section 8(a)(1) of the NLRA) when it discharged an employee.  IAM District Lodge 751

The National Labor Relations Board’s General Counsel’s Office’s Division of Advice has concluded that a union seeking to organize a construction employer’s drywall workers did not violate Section 8(b)(1)(A) of the National Labor Relations Act by  following the employer’s supervisors and managers aggressively in cars from the employer’s main office to various jobsites in the

An employer’s policy prohibiting employees from wearing baseball caps other than the employer’s is an unlawful restriction on employees’ Section 7 activity, an NLRB Administrative Law Judge has decided.  Quad Graphics, Inc., 32-CA-062242 (July 31, 2013).

Under the National Labor Relations Act, the wearing of union insignia by employees in most workplaces   generally is

An employer generally is prohibited by the National Labor Relations Act from enforcing a rule prohibiting employees from discussing their wages and benefits with one another. However, individuals who are considered to be supervisors under the NLRA are not protected by the Act. In a case of first impression involving the supervisory status of attorneys

Under the National Labor Relations Act, an employer is not permitted to bypass a union and deal directly with employees in connection with their terms and conditions of employment. This direct dealing concept can become complicated, however, when an individual employee asserts a legal proceeding against the employer in which the employee’s union is