Archives: Collective Bargaining

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Missourians Reject Right-to-Work

Missouri voters have rejected right-to-work. Senate Bill 19, which would have made Missouri the nation’s 28th right-to-work state, was passed by the Missouri legislature on February 2, 2017, and signed into law by then-Governor Eric Greitens. Labor organizations and their supporters gathered enough signatures to keep the law from going into effect until voters in … Continue Reading

Charter Schools Covered by NLRA? Not in Texas

The U.S. has more than 6,000 charter schools. They are authorized in almost every state. While state laws vary, their purpose is the same: to permit alternatives to traditional public schools, unbound by local school districts or district-wide collective bargaining agreements that can stifle innovation. These laws frame charters as public schools, subject to the … Continue Reading

Browning-Ferris Back in the Spotlight … and at the Court of Appeals?

The drama involving the National Labor Relations Board’s precedent-busting 2015 joint employer decision continues. Browning-Ferris Industries of California, Inc., 362 NLRB No. 186 (2015), dramatically changed the playing field for employers who rely on nontraditional workforces. The NLRB transformed its prior joint employment standard in Browning-Ferris into a two-part test that permits a finding of … Continue Reading

Changes

The song “Changes,” written by Phil Ochs, provides an opportune prism to examine the arguably cataclysmic changes implemented and portended by the new employer-friendly majority at the NLRB at the end of 2017 and expected in 2018.   Sing along, enjoy the lilt. Don’t cry o’er case law that’s spilt.   Come sit by my … Continue Reading

NLRB Reverses Course, Permits Employer Unilateral Changes

The National Labor Relations Board has restored the right of unionized employers to implement changes that are consistent with past practice (as long as the change does not materially vary in kind or degree from past changes), even if that practice developed under a management rights clause in a collective bargaining agreement that has expired, … Continue Reading

Union Membership Rates Remain Low – And AFL-CIO Claims Victories

Despite the National Labor Relations Board’s “quickie election” rule, the percentage of unionized workers in the private sector remained essentially stable 2017, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor. Only 6.5 percent of private-sector workers were in unions in 2017, an increase of 0.1 percent over the previous year. … Continue Reading

Kentucky’s Right-to-Work Law Survives Challenge

Kentucky’s right-to-work law has survived a challenge by the AFL-CIO and Teamsters union. The Kentucky legislation passed in the first week of the 2017 legislative session, making the Bluegrass State the 27th to adopt right-to-work legislation (Missouri was the 28th). A Kentucky state court dismissed the unions’ challenge to the law, which prohibits unions and … Continue Reading

NLRB Extends Time For Filing Responses To “Quickie Election” Request For Information

The National Labor Relations Board has extended the time for filing responses to its request for information regarding its 2014 election rule. The new date for submissions is Monday, March 19, 2018. In that request for information, the NLRB asked three questions: Should the 2014 Election Rule be retained without change? Should the 2014 Election … Continue Reading

Missouri to Vote on State’s Right-to-Work Law

When Missouri Republican Governor Eric Greitens signed “right-to-work” legislation into law on February 6, 2017, the Show-Me State was on the way to becoming the 28th state to prohibit unions and employers from requiring any employee to be a union member, or pay any dues or like amounts, as a condition of continued employment. Now, … Continue Reading

NLRB General Counsel Signals Important Changes at NLRB

National Labor Relations Board General Counsel Peter Robb continues to outline his plans for change at the NLRB.  First came his sweeping five-page Memorandum directing NLRB Regional Offices to submit to his Division of Advice for review cases involving “significant legal issues.” See our article, “New Labor Board General Counsel Issues Plans For Reversing Course.”  That was … Continue Reading

Management-Side Attorney John Ring Selected for Seat on Labor Board

President Donald Trump has nominated John Ring, a Washington, D.C.-based management-side labor and employment lawyer, to fill the vacant seat on the five-member National Labor Relations Board. If confirmed, Ring would replace former-NLRB Chairman Philip Miscimarra, a Republican, and restore a 3-2 Republican majority to the Board. Miscimarra’s term ended on December 16, 2017. Currently, … Continue Reading

New NLRB GC Opens Door to Possible Widespread Bargaining Unit Changes

The National Labor Relations Board General Counsel’s Division of Operations Management has issued a sweeping Memorandum to Regional Offices setting forth a variety of circumstances under which those offices should process “currently active [representation] cases” applying the NLRB’s recent decision (PCC Structurals, Inc.) that overruled Specialty Healthcare. “Currently active cases” is defined very broadly – … Continue Reading

Board Overrules Specialty Healthcare

In a stunning development, the National Labor Relations Board has overruled Specialty Healthcare, the so-called “micro-unit” decision and replaced the “overwhelming community-of-interest” standard adopted there with the traditional “community-of-interest” standard for determining an appropriate bargaining unit in union representation cases. PCC Structurals, Inc., 365 NLRB No. 160 (December 15, 2017). Under Specialty Healthcare, if a … Continue Reading

NLRB Overrules Browning-Ferris Joint Employer Standard, Reinstates Former Test

The National Labor Relations Board has overruled, 3-2, Browning-Ferris Industries, 362 NLRB No. 186 (2015) and returned to the pre–Browning Ferris standard that governed joint-employer liability. Hy-Brand Industrial Contractors Ltd., 365 No. 156 (December 14, 2017). The Board wrote: “We find that the Browning-Ferris standard is a distortion of common law as interpreted by the … Continue Reading

Labor Board Asks: Retain, Modify, or Rescind ‘Quickie Election’ Rules?

A Request for Information regarding the “Quickie Election” representation regulations (at 29 CFR parts 101 and 102) will be published on December 13, 2017, the National Labor Relations Board has announced. The RFI will seek input on the 2014 amendments to representation case procedures that reduced the opportunities for employers to communicate with their employees … Continue Reading

Congress One Step Closer to Restoring NLRB’s Joint Employer Standard

The U.S. House of Representatives has passed the “Save Local Business Act” (H.R. 3441), which would add a new, narrow definition of “employer” to the National Labor Relations Act (and the Fair Labor Standards Act) and which clarifies the definition of joint employment under both federal statutes. H.R. 3441 provides that two or more employers … Continue Reading

Robb’s Nomination as NLRB GC Approved by Senate

The U.S. Senate has confirmed Republican Peter Robb to replace Democrat Richard Griffin as National Labor Relations Board General Counsel. Griffin’s term expired on October 31, and Jennifer Abruzzo, who has served as Deputy GC since November 4, 2013, has been serving as Acting GC since. For a review of Griffin’s actions during his four … Continue Reading

The Thrill of Victory and the Agony of Defeat: Illinois Home Health Aides Must Sue Individually To Recoup Fair Share Fees

Home health aides who successfully objected to the collection of “fair share” fees without their consent may not proceed as a class, a panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit has ruled, affirming a lower court’s determination. Riffey v. Rauner, No.16-3487 (7th Cir. Oct. 11, 2017). The home health aides had … Continue Reading

Senate Committee Approves Trump’s NLRB General Counsel Nominee

A critical National Labor Relations Board nomination was approved by the Senate’s Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions on October 18, 2017, according to Bloomberg BNA. Management-side labor attorney Peter Robb’s nomination to be the Board’s next General Counsel has been long-anticipated by those interested in seeing changes in the agency’s doctrinal jurisprudence. The … Continue Reading

Employers Take Note: Public’s Approval of Unions Goes Up, Gallup Reports

Apparently, reports of the demise of organized labor are greatly exaggerated. According to a Gallup poll conducted from August 2 to 6, 2017, 61% of adults answered that they approve when asked, “Do you approve or disapprove of unions?” This is the highest percentage since 2003, when 65% said they approve. While only 22% of … Continue Reading

Labor Law Lessons from Our Favorite Films: Dirty Dancing (Weingarten Rights – Nobody Puts Weingarten In The Corner)

As noted in our previous post about Dirty Dancing, as part of its investigation into thefts of guests’ property, the resort owner interviewed staff dance instructor, Johnny Castle (Johnny denies involvement in the burglaries), to determine whether he had an alibi for the evening when Moe Pressman’s wallet was stolen. We now know that Castle responded … Continue Reading

Senate Confirms Kaplan for Vacant Board Seat, Moving NLRB Closer to Pro-Business Majority

The United States Senate has narrowly confirmed former counsel to the Commissioner of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission Marvin Kaplan to one of two vacant seats on the National Labor Relations Board. Kaplan’s confirmations leaves one vacant seat on the five-member Board. President Donald Trump has nominated management labor lawyer William Emanuel for … Continue Reading

Missouri Law Prohibits Costly Public Project Labor Agreements

On May 30, 2017, Missouri Governor Eric Greitens signed legislation generally barring public entities from requiring job-specific union contracts called “project labor agreements” on public construction projects.   The legislation, effective August 28, 2017, prohibits public entities from requiring contractors to enter into project labor agreements and from discriminating against, encouraging, or giving preferential treatment to … Continue Reading
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