The National Labor Relations Board will reconsider whether an employer can discipline an employee for the act of filing a class action, which has long been held to be protected concerted activity under the National Labor Relations Act. Cordua Restaurants, Inc., 16-CA-161380 (Aug. 15, 2018) (Cordua II).

The Board, sua sponte, vacated its Decision and Order in Cordua Restaurants, Inc., 366 NLRB No. 72 (Apr. 26, 2018) (Cordua I). In that case, the NLRB found the employer had violated the Act when it fired a worker for filing a collective wage and hour lawsuit against the company. The decision was issued prior to the U.S. Supreme Court’s Epic Systems Corp. v. Lewis, 584 U.S. __, 138 S. Ct. 1612 (2018), in which the Court ruled, 5-4, that class action waivers in employment arbitration agreements do not violate federal law.

In Cordua I, the NLRB (Members Mark Gaston Pearce, Lauren McFerran, and Marvin Kaplan formed the majority) held there was no dispute that the filing of the collective wage and hour lawsuit constituted protected concerted activity. The employer defended the termination, maintaining the employee was fired not because of his protected concerted activity, but because he attempted to steal employee wage information from confidential company files and lying about it during investigative interviews. The Board rejected the employer’s defense, noting that requests by employees for information relevant to Section 7 activities are protected, citing Faurecia Exhaust Systems, 355 NLRB 621, 622 (2010). That is the case even if the information is protected. However, the protection is lost if the information is sought or obtained surreptitiously. Ridgely Mfg. Co., 207 NLRB 193, 197 (1973), enfd. 510 F.2d 185 (D.C. Cir. 1975).

In Cordua II, an unpublished decision, Board Chairman John Ring and Members Kaplan and William Emanuel voted to vacate Cordua I, sua sponte. The Board held that it wants to “reconsider the entire proceeding.” The Board’s action signals the majority may hold that an employer may discipline an employee for the act of filing a class action.

Pearce and McFerran dissented, noting that nothing in Epic Systems Corp. warranted reopening the case since that Supreme Court decision addressed “the question of whether an employer’s maintenance of an arbitration agreement barring employees from bringing a collective action violated the Act,” whereas, in the instant case, the Board found the employer violated the Act by terminating an employee in response to his filing of a collective wage-and-hour lawsuit against the employer. Pearce and McFerran noted that it is “well settled that the filing of such a lawsuit constitutes protected concerted activity.”

We will report any further developments. Please contact a Jackson Lewis attorney if you have any questions.

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Photo of Linda R. Carlozzi Linda R. Carlozzi

Linda R. Carlozzi is a Principal in the New York City office of Jackson Lewis P.C. She joined Jackson Lewis in 1997 and specializes in traditional labor law. Ms. Carlozzi counsels clients in the development and implementation of preventive labor and employee relations…

Linda R. Carlozzi is a Principal in the New York City office of Jackson Lewis P.C. She joined Jackson Lewis in 1997 and specializes in traditional labor law. Ms. Carlozzi counsels clients in the development and implementation of preventive labor and employee relations programs. She advises both unionized and union-free clients on a full range of labor and employee relations matters, with a focus on traditional labor law. She has represented numerous employers during arbitration proceedings and negotiations. Ms. Carlozzi also counsels employers during union organizing drives and in labor and employment law proceedings before the National Labor Relations Board, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and other federal, state and city administrative agencies. She regularly represents employers in collective bargaining, provides advice on a diverse range of work place issues, such as those relating to corporate transactions, best workplace practices and conducts management training on a broad range of topics.

Photo of Howard M. Bloom Howard M. Bloom

Howard M. Bloom is a Principal in the Boston, Massachusetts, office of Jackson Lewis P.C. He has practiced labor and employment law representing exclusively employers for more than 36 years.

Mr. Bloom counsels clients in a variety of industries on labor law issues.

Howard M. Bloom is a Principal in the Boston, Massachusetts, office of Jackson Lewis P.C. He has practiced labor and employment law representing exclusively employers for more than 36 years.

Mr. Bloom counsels clients in a variety of industries on labor law issues. He trains and advises executives, managers and supervisors on union awareness and positive employee relations, and assists employers in connection with union card-signing efforts, traditional union representation and corporate campaigns, and union decertification campaigns. He also represents clients at the National Labor Relations Board in connection with bargaining unit issues, objections and challenges, as well as unfair labor practice investigations and trials. Mr. Bloom also has been the spokesperson at countless first and successor contract collective bargaining negotiations, and regularly advises on collective bargaining agreement administration issues, including grievance/arbitration issues.

Mr. Bloom has appeared before the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, several U.S. District Courts, the National Labor Relations Board, the Massachusetts Labor Relations Commission, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination.

Mr. Bloom speaks frequently to employer groups on a wide range of labor and employment law topics. He also has written extensively on labor and employment law for a variety of publications, including New England Business magazine, The Boston Globe and the Boston Business Journal. He also is editor of and a frequent contributor to the Jackson Lewis Labor & Collective Bargaining Blog.

While attending law school, he was the Executive Editor of The Advocate: the Suffolk University Law School Journal and President of the Student Bar Association.

Mr. Bloom is a diehard baseball fan. His first book, The Baseball Uncyclopedia: A Highly Opinionated Myth-Busting Guide to the Great American Game, was published in February 2006.

Photo of Philip B. Rosen Philip B. Rosen

Philip B. Rosen is a Principal in the New York City office of Jackson Lewis P.C. and a member of the Firm’s Management Committee. Mr. Rosen also leads the firm’s Labor Practice Group. He joined the Firm in 1979 and served as Managing…

Philip B. Rosen is a Principal in the New York City office of Jackson Lewis P.C. and a member of the Firm’s Management Committee. Mr. Rosen also leads the firm’s Labor Practice Group. He joined the Firm in 1979 and served as Managing Partner of the New York City office from 1989 to 2009.

Mr. Rosen lectures extensively, conducts management training, and advises clients with respect to legislative and regulatory initiatives, corporate strategies, business ethics, social media, reorganizations and reductions-in-force, purchase/sale transactions, sexual harassment and other workplace conduct rules, compliance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, wrongful discharge and other workplace litigation, corporate campaigns and union organizing matters, collective bargaining, arbitration and National Labor Relations Board proceedings. He has been quoted by the press on many labor matters, including the National Labor Relations Board’s recent initiatives on protected concerted activity and the proposed Notice Posting requirements.