Labor unions today are “tech” savvy, using mobile app and other technology to grow and maintain their memberships.

According to a report in the Bloomberg Bureau of National Affairs Daily Labor Report (136 DLR C-1 July 18, 2016), a number of labor unions, including the International Association of Machinists, Communication Workers of America, and Service Employees International Union, are using app technology to inform members of union news, sign political action petitions, access video clips and pictures, read press releases, view union social media accounts, and report workplace violations, all with the goal of reaching and growing their memberships.

Since labor unions are not generally permitted on an employer’s property to organize, labor unions are attempting to reach more and more workers through the use of their smartphones by mobile app technology and social media platforms, including Facebook, Snapchat, dedicated websites for blogging and reporting alleged workplace misconduct and the like. The use of technology by labor unions coupled with the National Labor Relations Board’s focus on broadening employee rights through the use of technology requires employers to stay ahead of the game.

In recent years, the NLRB also has developed a website to publicize employer labor violations, permitted the use of electronic union authorization cards in order to establish a “showing of interest” in support of the union representation petition, and allowed workers to use an employer’s email system on non-working time to engage in union organizing and other Section 7 (of the NLRA) concerted protected activities. The NLRB also has developed its own app. According to Bloomberg BNA, once it is free of its budget constraints, the NLRB has plans to upgrade the app to allow “workers, employers, and unions to take action from anywhere,” according to NLRB chairman Mark Gaston Pearce.

The use of technology by labor organizations to address labor issues and beef up declining memberships undoubtedly will increase regardless of the industry, labor climate, and overall workplace demographics.

Because of these new techniques, more and more organizing can be done by unions without face-to-face contact with employees. That could make it easier for unions to “meet with” many more employees in a shorter period of time and more effectively. To persuade employees to sign authorization cards who become star struck by the union’s glossy and upbeat electronic organizing tools. Employers should consider taking a preventive approach and informing their employees about these organizing techniques and cautioning employees not to be persuaded by glossy, upbeat organizing tools.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Print:
EmailTweetLikeLinkedIn
Photo of Howard M. Bloom Howard M. Bloom

Howard M. Bloom is a Principal in the Boston, Massachusetts, office of Jackson Lewis P.C. He has practiced labor and employment law representing exclusively employers for more than 36 years.

Mr. Bloom counsels clients in a variety of industries on labor law issues.

Howard M. Bloom is a Principal in the Boston, Massachusetts, office of Jackson Lewis P.C. He has practiced labor and employment law representing exclusively employers for more than 36 years.

Mr. Bloom counsels clients in a variety of industries on labor law issues. He trains and advises executives, managers and supervisors on union awareness and positive employee relations, and assists employers in connection with union card-signing efforts, traditional union representation and corporate campaigns, and union decertification campaigns. He also represents clients at the National Labor Relations Board in connection with bargaining unit issues, objections and challenges, as well as unfair labor practice investigations and trials. Mr. Bloom also has been the spokesperson at countless first and successor contract collective bargaining negotiations, and regularly advises on collective bargaining agreement administration issues, including grievance/arbitration issues.

Mr. Bloom has appeared before the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, several U.S. District Courts, the National Labor Relations Board, the Massachusetts Labor Relations Commission, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination.

Mr. Bloom speaks frequently to employer groups on a wide range of labor and employment law topics. He also has written extensively on labor and employment law for a variety of publications, including New England Business magazine, The Boston Globe and the Boston Business Journal. He also is editor of and a frequent contributor to the Jackson Lewis Labor & Collective Bargaining Blog.

While attending law school, he was the Executive Editor of The Advocate: the Suffolk University Law School Journal and President of the Student Bar Association.

Mr. Bloom is a diehard baseball fan. His first book, The Baseball Uncyclopedia: A Highly Opinionated Myth-Busting Guide to the Great American Game, was published in February 2006.

Photo of Chad P. Richter Chad P. Richter

Chad Richter is a Principal in the Omaha, Nebraska office of Jackson Lewis P.C.

Mr. Richter provides advice to management located throughout the country on issues surrounding the FMLA, ADA, WARN Act, Title VII, FLSA, workers’ compensation, NLRA, privacy issues, FCRA, and corollary…

Chad Richter is a Principal in the Omaha, Nebraska office of Jackson Lewis P.C.

Mr. Richter provides advice to management located throughout the country on issues surrounding the FMLA, ADA, WARN Act, Title VII, FLSA, workers’ compensation, NLRA, privacy issues, FCRA, and corollary state law. He routinely provides counsel on proactive strategies for employers located around the country. Mr. Richter has defended management in hundreds of charges of discrimination throughout the U.S., appearing before numerous local, state, and federal administrative agencies. He has represented management in arbitrations involving unjust terminations, contract interpretations, non-bargaining unit employees performing bargaining unit work, and workplace misconduct.

Photo of Philip B. Rosen Philip B. Rosen

Philip B. Rosen is a Principal in the New York City office of Jackson Lewis P.C. and a member of the Firm’s Management Committee. Mr. Rosen also leads the firm’s Labor Practice Group. He joined the Firm in 1979 and served as Managing…

Philip B. Rosen is a Principal in the New York City office of Jackson Lewis P.C. and a member of the Firm’s Management Committee. Mr. Rosen also leads the firm’s Labor Practice Group. He joined the Firm in 1979 and served as Managing Partner of the New York City office from 1989 to 2009.

Mr. Rosen lectures extensively, conducts management training, and advises clients with respect to legislative and regulatory initiatives, corporate strategies, business ethics, social media, reorganizations and reductions-in-force, purchase/sale transactions, sexual harassment and other workplace conduct rules, compliance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, wrongful discharge and other workplace litigation, corporate campaigns and union organizing matters, collective bargaining, arbitration and National Labor Relations Board proceedings. He has been quoted by the press on many labor matters, including the National Labor Relations Board’s recent initiatives on protected concerted activity and the proposed Notice Posting requirements.